Thursday, 20 July 2017

C&C Napoleonics - Rolica, 17th August 1808

Board set up for the battle. The French have a good defensive position on the hills close to the village of Rolica. French General Delaborde was outnumbered, but was to delay the enemy for as long as possible before falling back two miles to an even stronger position.




A few turns in and the British moved their two batteries of foot artillery in the centre forward and began counter-battery fire on the French guns on the hill. Between them they managed to destroy the French artillery very quickly and then turned their guns on the infantry, forcing one unit to retreat and virtually decimating a second. The British brigade commanded by General Fergusson on the left flank began to advance. The French hussars moved to block their path. The British flags on the two hills behind the French lines are British victory banner objectives.



The destroyed French artillery and most of a Light Infantry unit.



Before its demise, the French artillery did manage to inflict a loss in counter-battery fire. The British have one victory banner.



In the centre, the British stay put as their artillery pound the French positions.



On the left flank, the British Dragoons move up to face the French Hussars.



On the right flank, Colonel Trant (a British officer serving in the Army of Portugal) attached himself to a line unit.



The artillery barrage successfully removed all the French infantry from hills.



They did destroy the final block of the Light Infantry, so the British now lead 2 - 0 in victory banners.



Positions on the battlefield.



The British left flank continues its advance, the French Hussars charge and destroy the British Dragoons, taking a single casualty themselves and force a line unit into square. The charge causes no casualties, but the British muskets managed to score a kill with just a single die.



A victory banner for the French.



Half of the Hussar unit is off the board.



Positions on the battlefield.



British infantry cause a third casualty to the French hussars and also force them to retreat.



Just one block away from another British victory banner.



The unit in square should now be able to reform, and the card will be released.



The Portuguese begin their advance.



The French move units back onto the crest of the hill, and also begin to redeploy the hussars to the more vulnerable right flank.



The threadbare right flank of the French line.



More musketry sends the depleted hussar unit back to the baseline. The objective victory banner on the hill is looking very vulnerable now.



Battlefield at the end of the turn. The British continue to advance right along the lines. The French have to return to the crest line and run the gauntlet of the British cannon.



The British centre are beginning to reach musket range. The artillery removes one block and sends a unit of French infantry and their general, scurrying back down the reverse slope.



The French hussars complete their move from flank to flank.




Once more the British Foot Artillery can pick off units on the hill.



The French infantry lose a block from two units.



The casualties mount.



French musketry removes a block.



The British guns continue their brutal work, totally destroying one unit of infantry and and forcing another to retreat with just a single block remaining. The Horse Artillery on the left flank, also make their presence felt, destroying the single remaining block of the French hussars.



4 - 1 to the British now in victory banners, they need just one more to be victorious.



The fifth banner is just one step away from the advancing British infantry.



In desperation, the French hussars charge the British infantry, who promptly form square. The infantry suffer no losses but cause a hit, and a musketry from a second unit forces the hussars back.



On the other flank, the Portuguese hussars make a dash for the victory banner. However, when I read the conditions properly, the banner objectives have to be occupied by a British unit, so although wide open, it is out of reach of any eligible unit.



Once more the French climb wearily to the crest line, as British light infantry reach the foot of the hill.



Once again the hussars charge, but although not suffering or causing any losses they are forced to retreat. The British unit had not formed square and so escaped, this now will allow them to move on the next turn.



With the hussars pushed back, the British infantry unit occupies the victory banner hill, they only have to hold it until the beginning of their next turn for victory.



French muskets finally have a target, and they destroy two blocks of the Portuguese light infantry, sending the survivors scurrying back.


Still just the single victory banner, and not too many casualties for the Allies.



As the French hussars were unable to rally themselves for a charge on the British, the next turn began with the red coats still holding the hill, they claimed the fifth victory banner.



French losses.


A British victory by 5 - 1, quite convincing. The British had lots of centre and left flank cards during the game, but very few for the right. As the British commander I wanted my artillery to soften up the enemy on the hill before committing the infantry to cross the open ground and assault the hill. As I only had left flank cards, then it was this flank that did all the advancing. As the French commander, my only hope was for an unlikely frontal assault by the enemy, losing my only artillery unit within the first three turns was a disaster, and allowed the enemy to rake the crest line at leisure.

A very enjoyable first battle, the uncontested British artillery was brutal to the French on the hills, nullifying the strong position they held. It really was only a matter of time before the outnumbered French were defeated.

Next on the table will be Bussaco (Reynier's Assault) 27th September 1810.

4 comments:

  1. Nice battle report. Thanks for sharing. Reading this makes me want to pull my copy out and play.

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  2. It was my first ever battle as I only received the box on Sunday. Very enjoyable it is too. You should pull out your copy and give it a little table time.

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  3. It's nice how the same scenario turned out different in each of our games , i have updated my blog so you can see what happened in my game

    http://robssolowargames.blogspot.co.uk/2017/07/march-across-felt.html

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    1. I will pop over and have a read Rob.

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